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The Java(TM) Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference

The Java(TM) Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference
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The Java(TM) Developers Almanac 1.4, Volume 1: Examples and Quick Reference (4th Edition)
by Patrick Chan

Paperback: 1024 pages
Dimensions (in inches): 1.85 x 9.30 x 7.30
Publisher: Addison Wesley Professional
ISBN: 0201752808; 4th edition (March 25, 2002)


Amazon.com: While Java started out simply enough with relatively few objects and APIs, today's Java 2, Standard Edition (J2SE), bundles over 2,100 classes. The Java Developers Almanac provides a truly valuable reference to nearly all the classes and APIs in standard Java. This "white pages" for Java puts all classes and APIs at your fingertips, along with short samples that illustrate essential programming tasks.

It's a compliment to say that this title resembles a telephone book. With over 1,000 pages (and printed on similar paper stock), The Java Developers Almanac, like a phone book, is organized alphabetically. Early sections look at Java 2 classes by package, such as graphics (including Java 2D), file I/O, network programming, and AWT and Swing. Early sections include several hundred short code excerpts, which provide key programming solutions.

The heart of this text is an A-to-Z compendium of over 2,100 Java classes, and a whopping 24,000 methods and properties. Readers get a listing of what's in each class, along with prototype and arguments. As an "almanac," the book contains no room for explaining what each method does--by using a clever set of symbols, however, each listing provides the details of each method (such as which ones are "final," "static," and the like), plus the version of Java in which each method first appeared (JDK 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3). These reference sections set a new standard of clarity for documenting classes. (Method and property names are aligned in the middle of the page, regardless of return type; a typographic convention that makes it easy to find what you need quickly.)

Later sections provide useful references that list the changes from Java 1.0 through 1.3, as well as PersonalJava, the Java Native Interface (JNI), plus some of the details of the Java Virtual Machine (with a listing of byte codes). An innovative index cross-references all methods and classes (including where objects are used as parameters and return values). Truly encyclopedic and remarkably well organized, this book is a virtual must-have for any serious Java developer. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Comprehensive reference to Java 2, Standard Edition (J2SE) packages, classes and APIs (including 2,100 classes and 24,000 methods), sample code for common programming tasks, working with graphics and images (including Java 2D), playing audio and MIDI files, Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) and Swing components, JDBC database basics, directory programming with JNDI/LDAP, file system and file I/O, using the Java reflection APIs, basic socket, URL and networking in Java; RMI working with Strings, arrays and collections; Unicode, locale and internationalization support; documented changes in JDK 1.0 through JDK 1.3, the Java Native Interface (JNI), classes included in PersonalJava, and Java Virtual Machine (JVM) byte codes. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Book News, Inc.: The definitive, official reference to the Java 1.1 class libraries for Java programmers. The extensive class and member descriptions contain details crucial for developing professional applets and applications. Each description is supplemented by an example demonstrating the class or member in a relevant context. The 24,000 lines of code in some 600 examples facilitate learning-by-example and offer useful code fragments for projects. Book News, Inc.®, Portland, OR --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description: The Java(tm) Developers Almanac 2000 is the most up-to-date and complete quick reference for the Java Class Libraries-JDK(tm)1.0, 1.1, and J2SE(tm) v1.2, v1.3. (Due to space constraints, the javax.swing.plaf. packages are not included.) No other quick reference includes as much information in a single convenient volume. Information from 2,100 classes and 24,000 members is carefully formatted and arranged for easy lookup.

In this book you will find:
• More than 300 examplets(tm) that succinctly demonstrate the most common operations for a package
• Complete member listings of every class (including inherited members!)
• Class inheritance hierarchies for every package
• An extensive cross-reference section
• Detailed analysis of API changes for each major release
• Quick reference information for the language, the virtual machine, Java Native Interface, PersonalJava(tm) platform, and more
- No matter what level programmer you are, you will find this book an invaluable tool for everyday development.

Ingram: These example-driven, annotated references to the Java class libraries are an essential resource for Java programmers. Each class description includes a detailed overview describing its purpose and key concepts, a class hierarchy diagram showing its connection to related classes, and more.

Book Info: An annual which includes more than 300 examples that demonstrate the most common operations for a package, an extensive cross-reference section, detailed analysis of API changes for major release, and quick reference information for the language, the virtual machine, Java Native Interface, PersonalJava platform, and more. Previous edition: c1999.

From the Inside Flap: Welcome to the first edition of The Java™ Developers Almanac.

This book is a quick reference for the new Java 1.2 (beta 3) class libraries and several extension packages. It has been carefully designed to be used while you are deep in the throes of programming. In particular, the information is:

Comprehensive
The coverage of the core packages is complete so there's no need to consult other quick reference sources. Arranged and formatted for quick access
You won't lose your train of thought as you look up information.

Condensed
The book is no bigger than a pocket dictionary and so should always be within easy reach.

While this book is comprehensive, the libraries are so vast that there simply isn't enough room to provide equally comprehensive documentation.

The book is divided into four parts, briefly described next.

Part 1: Packages
This part covers each package in alphabetical order: a brief description of the package, a description of each class and interface in the package, and a hierarchy diagram showing the relationship between the classes and interfaces in the package. This part is useful when you need an overview of a package or want to see what other related classes are available in a package.

Part 2: Classes
This part contains 600 pages of class tables, one for each class in every package. Each class table includes a class tree that shows the ancestry of the class and a list of every member in the class. Also included in the member lists are inherited members from superclasses. Thus you have a complete view of all members made available by a class. This part is useful when you're already working with a particular class and want a quick reference to all of the members in the class.

Part 3: Topics
This part is a set of quick reference tables on miscellaneous topics. For example, the topic title "Java 1.2 (beta 3)" contains a detailed analysis of the API differences between Java 1.1 and Java 1.2. Other useful tables cover documentation comment tags and available system properties, among other topics.

Part 4: Cross-Reference
This part is a cross-reference of all of the Java classes and interfaces covered in this book. It includes classes from both core and extension packages. This part is useful when you have questions such as What methods return an Image object? or What are the subclasses of java.io.InputStream? Updates

As the title suggests, this book is intended to be updated whenever a new major version of the Java class libraries is released. Since it is designed for you to use in your everyday programming-related work, I would love to hear how I could improve it for the next issue or simply what you thought about it. For example, are there any more useful tables you'd like to see in Part 3? Although I'm afraid I probably won't be able to reply, I promise to read and consider each suggestion I receive. You can reach me at the following e-mail address:

almanac@xeo Package Versions Here are the versions of the packages included in this book: Java 1.2 Beta 3 JavaMail 1.0 Beta 2 JavaBeans Activation Framework (JAF) 0.5 Beta 2 Java Media Framework (JMF) 1.0 Beta Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) 1.1 Java Servlet 1.1 Java 3D 1.0 Early Access Acknowledgments

First and foremost, I thank Mike Hendrickson, who spent a great deal of time collaborating with me on this project. He helped me hone the ideas in this book and then supported me all of the way. It's been tremendous fun working with him.

Arthur Ogawa (ogawa@teleport), TeX master extraordinaire, provided me with TeX macros without which this book would have been impossible. Thanks for working with me in the wee hours of the morning trying to get everything just right.

I want to thank Lisa Friendly, the series editor, for all sorts of help getting this book off the ground and for getting me all of the support I needed.

Special thanks to Rosanna, my wife, who finished our last book while I was busy on this one. She also wrote the package and property summaries and helped me with layout.

Many people gave me feedback or provided some other assistance in the making of this book. Thanks to Jens Alfke, Ken Arnold, Josh Bloch, Paul Bommarito, David Brownell, Michael Bundschuh, Bartley Calder, Casey Cameron, Mark Drumm, Robert Field, Jeff Jackson, Doug Kramer, Sheng Liang, Tim Lindholm, Hans Muller, John Pampuch, Rob Posadas, Mark Reinhold, Georges Saab, Kathy Walrath, Bill Shannon, Ann Sunhachawee, and Bruce Wallace.

Finally, I want to thank the wonderful people at Addison-Wesley who made this project a lot of fun: Sarah Weaver, Tracy Russ, and Marina Lang. Patrick Chan February 1998 0201379678P04062001 --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover: The Ultimate Java Technology Quick Reference "I love this book. Its dense condensation of the details a developer needs makes it the one book I pull out over and over again." --James Gosling, Fellow and Vice President, Sun Microsystems, Inc., and inventor of the Java™ programming language

"This reminds me of the catalogs of integrated circuits that we use to build hardware systems, and shows how far and fast Java™ technology has come in having a library of incredibly useful software components. An indispensable desk reference!" --Bill Joy, cofounder, Sun Microsystems, Inc. Quoted from his keynote at JavaOne

"I think this book is, quite simply, a stroke of genius. I've been lamenting the stack of books on Java™ technology I've had to pore over when all I needed was a detail about some method or package. The Almanac is the one-stop shop I was unconsciously waiting for." --John Vlissides, IBM TJ Watson, and coauthor of the best-selling book, Design Patterns The Java™ Developers Almanac 1.4 is the most up-to-date and complete quick reference for the Java Class Libraries--JDK™ 1.0, 1.1, and J2SE™ v1.2, v1.3, v1.4.

Information for 3,000 classes and 32,000 members is carefully formatted and arranged for easy lookup. In these two volumes you will find: 900 examples demonstrating the use of over 1000 classes and 4000 members. Complete member listings of every class (including inherited members!), with references to examples that demonstrate usage Class inheritance hierarchies for every package An extensive cross-reference section Detailed analysis of API changes for each major release Volume 1 covers java.beans to org.xml, 91 packages useful for server-side development. Volume 2 covers java.applet to javax.swing, 45 packages useful for developing GUI applications. No matter what level programmer you are, you will find this book an invaluable tool for everyday development. 0201752808B03142002

About the Author: Patrick Chan, CTO of Bluelight, was a founding member and lead developer of the original Java platform project at Sun Microsystems, Inc. He was the winner of the 1998 Duke Award at JavaOne and he is also co-author of the Java Class Libraries books and posters in the Java™ Series.

Rosanna Lee is a Senior Staff Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where she led the design and development of the JNDI technology and the X/Open Federated Naming (XFN). She is also co-author of the Java Class Libraries books and posters in the Java Series

Doug Kramer is a lead writer for the Java Development Kit and Senior Technical Writer at JavaSoft, Sun Microsystems, Inc. He previously worked at Kaleida Labs and Macromind, documenting multimedia technology and designing graphical user interfaces.

0201310023AB04062001 --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Excerpted from The Java(TM) Developers Almanac v1.4: Examples and Quick Reference (Volume 1) by Patrick Chan, Lan-Ahn Dang. Copyright © 2002. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
Welcome to the fourth edition of The Java™ Developers Almanac.There was a time when I intimately knew all of the Java class libraries. I knew how it allworked and exactly how everything fit together. I knew what subclassed what, what overrodewhat, and so on (of course, it helped that I was one of the original developers:-). But aside from the occasional inability to remember which argument of Vector.insertElementAt() is the index, I rarely had to refer to any reference documentation.

Version 1.1 added 250 classes and my mastery of the Java class libraries was reduced tohalf. This left me feeling a little disoriented since I no longer knew my way around, and theincreased size of the libraries exceeded my ability to recall the details of the signatures.

Since I make my living writing Java code, it was important that I find an efficient way of"navigating" the new libraries. What I wanted was a quick overview of all of the libraries;something that covered every class and briefly showed their relationships; something thatwould allow me to explore and quickly learn about new packages. This need led to this book.

The Java™ Developers Almanac is like a map of the Java class libraries. It's a compactand portable tool that covers almost all of the libraries, if only from a bird's-eye view. It'sgreat for reminding you of things like method names and parameters. With today's class countat 3000, you're bound to forget a few details now and again. The almanac is great for discoveringthe relationships between the classes, such as determining all methods that return animage. It's also great for quickly exploring a new package.

While this book is comprehensive, the libraries are so vast that there simply isn't enoughroom to provide equally comprehensive documentation. So if you're working with a packagethat is new to you, you'll probably also need a tutorial book such as The Java Tutorial, SecondEdition (Campione and Walrath, Addison-Wesley, 1998), a detailed reference such as The JavaClass Libraries, Volumes 1 and 2 (Chan, Lee, and Kramer, Addison-Wesley, 1998), and/or theon-line documentation at java.sun/docs.The book is divided into four parts, briefly described next.

Part 1: PackagesThis part covers each package in alphabetical order: a brief description of the package, a descriptionof each class and interface in the package, and a hierarchy diagram showing the relationshipbetween the classes and interfaces in the package. This part is useful when you need an overviewof a package or want to see what other related classes are available in a package.

Most packages provide a number of examples demonstrating common usage of classes inthe package. The examples are designed to demonstrate a particular task using the smallestamount of code possible. Their main purpose is to show you which classes are involved in thedescribed task and generally how they interact with each other.

Part 2: ClassesThis part contains 500 pages of class tables, one for each class in all the covered packages. Eachclass table includes a class tree that shows the ancestry of the class and a list of every member inthe class. Also included in the member lists are inherited members from superclasses. Thus youhave a complete view of all members made available by a class. This part is useful when you'realready working with a particular class and want a quick reference to all of the members in theclass. New for this edition are example numbers on some of the members. This number refers toan example that demonstrates the use of the member (or a related member).

Part 3: TopicsThis part is a set of quick-reference tables on miscellaneous topics. For example, the topic title"Java 1.4" contains a detailed analysis of the API differences between Java 1.3 and Java 1.4.

Part 4: Cross-ReferenceThis part is a cross-reference of all of the Java classes and interfaces covered in this book. Thispart is useful when you have questions such as What methods return an Image object? or Whatare all the descendents of java.io.InputStream?

UpdatesAs the title suggests, this book is intended to be updated whenever a new major version of theJava class libraries is released. Since it is designed for you to use in your everyday programming-related work, I would love to hear how I could improve it for the next version or simplywhat you thought about it. Although I'm afraid I probably won't be able to reply, I promise toread and consider each suggestion I receive. You can reach me at the following e-mail address:almanac14@xeo.com 0201752808P02282002


Customer Reviews
half of it useful, May 10, 2002
Reviewer: Alexis rzewski from Pittsburgh

nice and soft, printed on light thin paper, the book is divided in two halves. The first half has snippets of code showing how to do this and that, organized in package order (javax.swing are in the yet to be published 2nd volume). Very useful. The second half is a very detailed class documentation in alphabetical order. My take is that if you have an IDE like VisualAge, which allows you to browse through classes and methods, and their references, senders, implementors, then this section of the book is not necessary. On the other hand, if you leaf through the latest Java in a Nutshell... The first half of the book also reminds of Java Cookbook. Couple of things I am perplexed by all these example books is that when exposing an example with dates, they all use the Date class. Unfortunately, this class cannot represent a date prior to 1970, thus many birtdays of living adults today cannot be represented (CalendarDate should be used). The other difficulty in finding example is custom events, property change events, non-bean events.

Complete resource for class names and interfaces, January 11, 2000
Reviewer: Charles Ashbacher from Hiawatha, IA

Given the large size of the current class libraries in Java, the quality of your references is now more critical than ever. In my work as a technical editor of Java books, I have found this book invaluable. The content consists almost entirely of the class names, what they are derived from and the interfaces. The remainder is a collection of "examplets", small snippets of code that show how some of the methods are used. Alphabetized based on the class names, it is adequate when your only interest is in the name of a class or the characteristics of a method. Of course, it is only my first avenue, for more detailed information it is necessary to consult another resource. However, in many of those instances, consulting this book first saved time in examining the other documentation. Covering versions, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 of the JDK, this is one shelf reference that you should not be without. I listed it as one of the best books of the year in my On Books column that appeared in the September,1999 issue of Journal of Object-Oriented Programming.

A great reference for a language growing in complexity, April 13, 2002
Reviewer: Charles Ashbacher from Hiawatha, Iowa United States

Once again, I have found a book for my special shelf of frequently used reference books that I keep within arms reach. This book starts with the Java library at the level of the package and then works down to the individual class level. I find such a reference absolutely essential and my copy of the original Java Developers Almanac has been used so often that the individual pages are falling out. I teach Java classes to experienced developers and I have always kept it at my side to answer those inevitable questions concerning prototypes and other methods available in a class.

The examples in this book make it more helpful than if it was just a listing of methods. While I can generally figure out how a method is used from the prototype, seeing it called in a plausible scenario generally reduces the time in going from bafflement to understanding. The book is also well indexed, so very little time is wasted in searching for the desired package or class.

I strongly recommend this book as a reference for the Java language, and it will appear on my list of top ten books of the year.

Nothing can describe Java classes better, August 21, 2001
Reviewer: Filip Rachunek from Praha 1 Czech Republic

I strongly recommend this book to all Java users of all levels because no other book describes all classes of java.lang, java.io, java.net, java.util, java.text and java.math packages better. Every class, every method and every exception is explained by very understandable language with good and useful examples. There is no Java language problem you cannot solve with this book.






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