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JNDI API Tutorial and Reference: Building Directory-Enabled Java(TM) Applications

JNDI API Tutorial and Reference: Building Directory-Enabled Java(TM) Applications
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JNDI API Tutorial and Reference: Building Directory-Enabled Java(TM) Applications
by Rosanna Lee, Scott Seligman

Paperback: 848 pages
Dimensions (in inches): 1.60 x 9.22 x 7.36
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Pub Co
ISBN: 0201705028; 1st edition (May 30, 2000)


Amazon.com: Aimed at the Java developer who wants to program with corporate directories, the JNDI API Tutorial and Reference provides a notably comprehensive tour of basic and advanced topics in JNDI programming. Featuring dozens of useful code excerpts that show just how to do it, this practically minded guide is all you need to use this powerful API standard effectively.

This book includes a printed version of Sun's online JNDI tutorial that is bundled with a comprehensive guide to JNDI classes. First, the authors show you how to get and up and running with JNDI and how to handle basic look-ups in directories. (A practical note is that this title is excellent when describing the actual error messages and "common problems" that you might face in your code, and how to resolve them.) While many programmers will use this book to learn how to search, read, and write directory entries, they'll find it good at explaining how JNDI fits in with other directory standards, too (such as LDAP). The authors also cover how to access multiple "federations" of directories, as well as hooking into directory "events" or notifications. For experts, more advanced sections look at the ins and outs of creating your own directory servers. The last 300 pages provide a worthy reference to every JNDI class (with over 80 classes) and every property and method, along with links to the examples in the first tutorial section that illustrate each class in action.

Whether you're someone who just wants to get started with directory programming, or if you'll be designing JNDI servers from the ground up, you'll find the JNDI API Tutorial and Reference to be a solid resource for effective directory programming for Java developers of all levels. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered:
• Basic and advanced tutorial for the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI), naming conventions using strings and URLs, directory basics
• Attributes, directory services, and searches
• Directory and object stores, JNDI overview
• Architecture, context, names, bindings, and references
• LDAP support, federations, basic JNDI programming examples, common problems and solutions, tutorial for simple naming and directory operations, storing and retrieving Java objects in directories, state and object factories, tips for combining JNDI and LDAP directory programming, creating a JNDI-enabled service provider, and reference to all JNDI classes.

From Book News, Inc.: A book/CD-ROM tutorial and reference providing an introduction to naming and directory technologies and an overview of the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI). The tutorial progresses from basic to advanced JNDI capabilities and techniques, and includes some 200 working examples that demonstrate writing, compiling, and running directory-enabled Java programs. A reference section documents all JNDI classes and interfaces. The accompanying CD-ROM includes JNDI software and service providers, the Java 2 platform, and a hypertext version of the Java Tutorials, the JDBC tutorials, and the JNDI tutorial. Lee is Senior Staff Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Seligman is Staff Engineer with the Java Software Development group at Sun Microsystems, Inc.Book News, Inc.®, Portland, OR

Book Info: (Pearson Education) Provides an introduction to naming and directory technologies and an overview of the Java Naming and Directory Interface. Topics include accessing the LDAP via JNDI, using the directory as an object repository, configuring a JNDI client, building a JNDI service provider, and more. Softcover. DLC: JNDI.

From the Back Cover: This book provides an introduction to naming and directory technologies and an overview of the Java Naming and Directory Interface™ (JNDI). The tutorial in this book progresses from the most basic to advanced JNDI capabilities and techniques, including more than 200 working examples that demonstrate writing, compiling, and running directory-enabled Java™ programs. In addition, this book contains a comprehensive reference section that documents all JNDI classes and interfaces. The accompanying CD-ROM includes JNDI software and service providers, the Java 2 platform, and the hypertext version of the Java Tutorials, the JDBC™ tutorials, and the JNDI tutorial.

JNDI enables programs written in the Java programming language to access naming and directory services—a vital element of the complex distributed computing environment for today's enterprise systems. A platform-independent interface, JNDI allows Java applications to work with standard and proprietary services from a variety of vendors—including the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), Novell Directory Service (NDS), Microsoft Active Directory, and the Solaris™ Operating Environment Network Information Service (NIS)—so that enterprises need not lock into a single-vendor solution.

Specific topics covered include:
• Accessing the LDAP via JNDI
• Using the directory as an object repository
• Configuring a JNDI client
• Handling event notifications from the directory
• Creating a federation of naming systems
• Building a JNDI service provider

All developers using the Java programming language to write applications or subsystems that access naming and directory services will find this book an indispensable resource. 0201705028B04062001

About the Author: Rosanna Lee is a Senior Staff Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where she led the design and development of the JNDI technology and the X/Open Federated Naming (XFN). She is also co-author of the Java Class Libraries books and posters in the Java Series

Scott Seligman, a Staff Engineer with the Java Software Development group at Sun Microsystems, Inc., is a lead designer and developer of the JNDI technology. He contributed extensively to the naming and directory clients for the Solaris Operating Environment, including XFN and the Name Service Switch. Scott is the lead engineer for the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition, v1.4.


Customer Reviews
get it online, November 8, 2001
Reviewer: Gary from Atlanta, GA United States

I heard the material was the same, but was hoping for a more thoughtful layout and more of a teaching perspective. No such luck.

Definitely not for a novice, April 8, 2001
Reviewer: A reader from Derry, NH

Having about a year or so experience with Java, I bought this book intending to use JNDI on a project. I was hoping for a clear, simple tutorial; instead I had to wrestle with setting up my environment for at least two hours before I could even run one sample program. The authors do NOT clearly state which .JAR files have to go in jre/lib/ext, they do not explain that the path in the samples needs to be changed from /tmp/tutorial to whatever directory you are working in, and some of their examples are wrong (page 27 - the Lookup program does NOT take a command-line argument). I haven't started the Directory Operations chapter yet (since it requires an LDAP server and I haven't installed one yet), but if it took this long just to get through the basics, I have a feeling I'm going to be spending a lot of time reading Sun's forums looking for answers...

So far the best, September 13, 2000
Reviewer: A reader from Chestnut Hill, MA USA

After reading documentation of JNDI and Wrox's Java Server Programming book, I realized that I need a more detailed hands-on book. I downloaded Netscape Directory Server for NT and read its document. Unfortunately (or fortunately), I can make my java program work on JNDI, LDAP until I read THIS book. I am happy to find it on sun's website. Make comparison by yourself. It is really an excellent book on JNDI.

Good book, but..., August 31, 2000
Reviewer: _nagabhushanam_ from Redwood Shores, CA United States

I have gone through this book, and find that it lacks systematic detailed information on the Preparations section, before being able to attempt the examples in the book. In my opinion this is a very serious drawback, and can throw off readers new to JNDI. So, in essence this book can be further improved upon by the authors with due consideration to the initial preparedness and loading of seed data sections, to enable the readers who attempt the examples, a more fruitful and enjoyable experience.






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