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JDBC(TM) API Tutorial and Reference: Universal Data Access for the Java(TM) 2 Platform

JDBC(TM) API Tutorial and Reference: Universal Data Access for the Java(TM) 2 Platform
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JDBC(TM) API Tutorial and Reference: Universal Data Access for the Java(TM) 2 Platform (2nd Edition)
by Seth White, Maydene Fisher, Rick Cattell, Graham Hamilton, Mark Hapner

Paperback: 1059 pages
Dimensions (in inches): 1.95 x 9.22 x 7.40
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Pub Co
ISBN: 0201433281; 2nd edition (June 11, 1999)


Amazon.com: The second edition of the JDBC API Tutorial and Reference provides a worthwhile tour of the new features in Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) 2.0 and serves well as a reference to Sun's new standard for Java database programming.

Once you open this book, it becomes quickly obvious that it is more comprehensive than the first edition. The new edition begins with an overview of the JDBC API, including its architecture and overall design. Beginners will also be pleased with a short breakdown of the Java programming language and SQL basics.

Early sections of the book walk through an approachable tutorial of JDBC, concentrating on topics such as connecting to databases, retrieving result sets, manipulating records, and handling database transactions. There's also coverage of using stored procedures, including embedded SQL with SQLJ.

The book then turns to new JDBC 2.0 API features, like scrollable cursors, updateable record sets, and batch updates. Experienced readers will appreciate how the authors show off JDBC 1.0 code before presenting these new features. An explanation of SQL3 data types supported in JDBC 2.0 follow the discussion of the API features.

The book provides extensive support for finding and understanding recordsets and databases, including the use of the oddly named ResultSetMetaData and DatabaseMetaData classes, which have been greatly enhanced in JDBC 2.0. (You can now write Java code that customizes itself at runtime for almost any SQL platform.) Similar in spirit to the Microsoft OLE DB, the new JDBC 2.0 now supports rowsets, which let programmers work with any tabular data store from within their applications.

Most of the book (over 600 pages) functions as a reference containing every JDBC 2.0 class. Presented alphabetically, each class comes with an introductory definition and a complete listing of its constituent members and methods (including deprecated APIs). Final sections include a guide to "SQL to Java" mappings and tips for writing JDBC drivers.

Whether you are approaching JDBC for the very first time or are ramping up from JDBC 1.0, there is perhaps no better source for learning about the enhanced powers of the new JDBC than this "official" guide from Sun. --Richard Dragan

Book News, Inc.: Provides a definitive description of the JDBC API, the technology that enables universal data access for the Java programming language. Combines a step-by-step tutorial with a comprehensive reference to all of the classes and interface, and gives in-depth explanations that go beyond the specification. Offers an introduction for those new to the Java programming language and to SQL, then walks through creating a JDBC application, with many examples, and discusses advanced topics. White is a member of the technical staff at Java Software, where he led the design of the JDBC 2.0 API. -- Copyright © 1999 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR All rights reserved

Book Description: This book provides the definitive description of the JDBC(tm) API, the technology that enables universal data access for the Java(tm) programming language. This new edition has been updated and expanded to cover all of the JDBC 2.0 API, including the JDBC 2.0 core API and the JDBC Standard Extension API, the package that facilitates building server-side applications.

Containing in-depth explanations that go beyond the specification, this complete resource pairs a step-by-step tutorial with a comprehensive reference to all of the classes and interfaces.

For those new to Java technology, the book includes an introduction to the Java programming language and to SQL. It builds on this basic knowledge to walk you through creating a JDBC application-from setting up a database and establishing a connection to retrieving values from result sets and using prepared statements. In addition, the authors provide many examples along the way that demonstrate how to execute common tasks. The book proceeds to more advanced topics, focusing on the new features of the JDBC 2.0 API, including scrollable and updatable result sets, batch updates, SQL3 data types, custom mapping, and more.

You will also find an introduction to working with the JDBC metadata API as well as information on rowsets, the technology that makes it possible to handle data sets from virtually any data source as JavaBeans(tm) components.

From array to XADataSource, a useful alphabetical reference provides concise but complete information on each class and interface in the JDBC API. Each entry includes an overview as well as a list and explanation of the methods and fields.

A chapter on mapping SQL types and types in the Java programming language, a summary of the new JDBC 2.0 features, and a glossary complete this indispensable resource for all database programmers.

From the Back Cover: Containing in-depth explanations that go beyond the specification, this complete resource pairs a step-by-step tutorial with a comprehensive reference to all of the classes and interfaces.

For those new to Java technology, the book includes an introduction to the Java programming language and to SQL. It builds on this basic knowledge to walk you through creating a JDBC application–from setting up a database and establishing a connection to retrieving values from result sets and using prepared statements. In addition, the authors provide many examples along the way that demonstrate how to execute common tasks. The book proceeds to more advanced topics, focusing on the new features of the JDBC 2.0 API, including scrollable and updatable result sets, batch updates, SQL3 data types, custom mapping, and more.

You will also find an introduction to working with the JDBC metadata API as well as information on rowsets, the technology that makes it possible to handle data sets from any source such as JavaBeans™ components.

From array to XADataSource, a useful alphabetical reference provides concise but complete information on each class and interface in the JDBC API. Each entry includes an overview as well as a list and explanation of the methods and fields.

A chapter on mapping SQL types and types in the Java programming language, a summary of the new JDBC 2.0 features, and a glossary complete this indispensable resource for all database programmers. 0201433281B04062001

About the Author: Seth White is a member of the technical staff at Java Software, where he led the design of the JDBC 2.0 API.

Maydene Fisher has extensive experience as a technical writer specializing in the documentation of object-oriented programming languages. Fisher began her technical writing career on Wall Street, where she documented complex computer models, written in C++, for simulating fixed income derivatives. Before joining the JDBC team at JavaSoft she wrote documentation for ScriptX, an object-oriented multimedia scripting language, at Kaleida Labs and at Apple Computer.

Dr. Rick Cattell, a Distinguished Engineer at JavaSoft, led the design of the JDBC API. He is currently Chief Architect for the Java Enterprise Technologies group. He was previously responsible for SunSoft's NEO CORBA database integration and the Sun Simplify database GUI. Widely recognized for his contributions to the database field, Dr. Cattell was a cofounder of SQL Access, founder and chair of the Object Database Management Group (ODMG), and author of the first monograph on object database systems as well as more than 40 papers and 3 books.

Dr. Graham Hamilton is a Distinguished Engineer at JavaSoft where he led the design of the JDBC API, the JavaOS™ standalone Java system, and the JavaBeans™ component architecture. He was previously the technical lead for the Spring distributed object-oriented operating system project at Sun, and he has written a variety of papers and patents on operating systems and distributed systems.

Mark Hapner is Lead Architect for the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition. He participated in the development of the JDBC API, wrote the Java Message Service specification, and co-authored the Enterprise JavaBeans specification.


Customer Reviews
Best JDBC book available, February 29, 2000
Reviewer: Glenn McEnroe from San Mateo, CA

I found this book to be the most current regarding JDBC. I found it very useful reference guide in the development of a moderately complex database frontend applet/application. This book covers the api pretty well. I would like to see additional information published about implementation, performance tuning, and code optimization strategies, but understand the difficulty of providing up to date information in this area.

An excellent reference for JDBC core & standard extensions, September 27, 1999
Reviewer: A reader from U.S.A.

This book provides an excellent tutorial on JDBC 2.0 core features and standard extensions. In particular, the chapters on standard extensions (XA, connection pooling,...) provide unique step-by-step descriptions/examples that offer a top-down view of these features.

A difficult balance achieved, February 27, 2002
Reviewer: Vince O'Sullivan from London, England.

This is a comprehensive guide to all aspects of JDBC. It pretty much succeeds in being all things to all people. The chapters are verbose and well thought out - as befits a tutorial book - and each one is rounded off with a comprehensive guide to all the relevant JDBC API calls - as you would expect from a reference book.

The example's are a little lightweight but nevertheless they work and they do illustrate the points being made in the text.

I bought this book about a month ago to get me up to speed on Java's take on SQL and now find that, in addition to showing me the Java, I know twice as much about SQL as I did before.

Well recommended.

A good, Concise guide, December 31, 2001
Reviewer: Alan Ramsay from LEVEN, Fife United Kingdom

At last, a Java book that cuts through the nonsense, gives sound advice and examples and delivers what it promises. This is my number one choice as a JDBC reference.






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